Building an Imperial Knight Part 2

Sep
30

Building an Imperial Knight Part 2

As we’ve covered building our model into strategic sub assemblies in part 1, it’s now time to start our painting work.  Building an Imperial Knight is an investment of time and effort, so don’t be afraid to put in a fair bit of time on the paint.  The final model will be a show piece for your army (and a terror on the tabletop, I can assure you).

The Iron Giant

The Iron Giant

So if you’ve been following along with us, you have your assembled knight, minus his armor plates ready to be painted.  If you haven’t primed already, it’s time, just be careful to keep the joints mobile until you’ve struck upon a pose.  If you’re glueing your knight into a fixed position and know how you want it to look, disregard.

If you missed part 1 for some reason, you can find it here.

The painting of the skeleton follows a fairly easy, if time consuming pattern.  We’re going to cover the entire model in Leadbelcher or other gunmetal as a basic “metal” coat on our Knight.  Take time to properly thin your paint and apply it evenly across the model.  Now, since this model has a lot of small divits and other places to trap paint, keep the paint on your brush light and your strokes quick to avoid clogging up the detail.

Leg with gun metal, bronze, and nuln oil applied

Leg with gun metal, bronze, and nuln oil applied

Next, take either a bronze or gold (depending what strikes your fancy), and pick detail pieces to color in with this paint.  We’re doing this for some contrast and break up the uniformity.

Once we let this dry, the next coat is Nuln Oil.  The black shade will help add contrast, refine details, and add a greasey look to the flat sections.  This helps create the look of machinery or industrial equipment.  Shades tend to be messy, so make sure you have something handy to get your hands clean as you work; you will accidentally pick up a wet section at some point.  I certaily did.

Let the shade dry out completely before proceeding to the next step, which is to take a metallic dry paint (if you’re using GW’s paints, it’s Necron compound).  As before, load your brush lightly and dry brush the paint across the edges and surfaces.  There’s no reason to get it too deep into gaps; we’re trying to create the look of worn edges that will help make the metal look real.

Knight Titan face

Knight Titan face

Once we’ve gotten our dry brushing done, we’ll want to add a few key detail painting bits.  I followed GW’s suggestion and went with using a flat black to paint the various hoses to give them a rubbery look.  I then took Runefang Steel (or another silver if you prefer), and carefully painted the piston bodies on the legs and arms, to give these the look of having been moved often.  A little Agrax Earthshade (really just a ring) at the top and bottom of each give the appearance of accumulated grime.  Finally, as seen above, we need to do the eyes.  I find reds and greens work best, but really the only key is that you have three shades of the color you want to use and a pure white for the center.

Arrange your three colors from dark to light.  Completely fill the eye sockets with the darkest and let it dry.  Then the next shade, make a circle that fills most but not all of the socket.  Next, with the brightest hue, create a very small circle at the center.  Finally, add a single pin prick of white to the center.  You’ll get something like the look above.

In part 3, we’ll cover the armor plates and in part 4, the application of transfers (each matching with the corresponding GW video tutorial for added instructional help).

And below, we have GW’s expert guidance, please give them a look to, I’ll be here bantering about.

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