Building an Imperial Knight Part 1

Aug
26

Building an Imperial Knight Part 1

So today we’re going to take you through my own humble efforts to build an Imperial Knight, using GW’s very handy instructional videos for insight along with photos along the way of how my efforts went. Full Disclosure; I suck at this.

Lushbane

Lushbane

The Imperial Knight Titan stands as a colossus on the battlefield, easily towering most other units in the game. As such, she should be a center piece of time and effort, a presentation of your hard work in a model that probably lasts through the first volley. Hopefully here we can help you build an Imperial Knight worthy of a few table top battlefield stories.

So lets see how we got here, one step at a time and included at the end will be the video from Games Workshop we used in our building and preparation. This first part is centered on preparing the model and sub assemblies as well as priming. We’ll also show you how we magnetized it, which is unfortunately not covered in GW’s video.

Imperial Knight Sprues

Primed and ready

Some people like to assemble first before priming; I find it easier to prime while they are on the sprue and then touch up the primer where necessary after the sub assemblies are built. Call if lazy if you will, but it is fast and very effective. We used the Citadel Black primer spray on top of newspapers in a nice open area in my backyard. Always practice safe painting discipline, never spray the paint towards yourself or an observer; especially not in the face!

You’ll be starting with the legs and following the out of the box assembly instructions. You’ll want a clipper to cut pieces from the sprues and some modeling sandpaper and knife to take off any nubs that remain after you clip.

Legs first

Legs first

Use the sandpaper to work down any uneven lines or molding left behind. Careful with finer details, but for big “metal” limbs and bits, you’re pretty safe in this. You’re not looking to demolish it, but you should be able to rather easily even it out. Don’t worry about any primer you take off, we’ll be repainting later on anyway.

Be sure to test assemble the parts before you start gluing. If something doesn’t seem to fit together, look at the directions; you may find you have something backwards. I had the connector between the foot and the leg upside down when I was first trying to assemble them. Fortunately, I was checking before glueing, so no harm, no foul. The legs are particularly difficult to assemble (most of the torso is a bit more obvious what goes where). Take your time, carefully glue in small measured amounts and allow each section to dry properly before proceeding to the next step.

As you’re assembling, leave off the armor plates and their connectors for now. It’s much easier to paint the superstructure for both the lower and upper half without the armor plates in place, and conversely; they need rich detail work, so they’re easier to at least get started off the model. As always; pay careful attention to each step of the instructions as there are a number of pieces that need to be oriented correctly; particularly in the lower assembly.

Even small parts can be carefully sanded to remove edges

Even small parts can be carefully sanded to remove edges

Legs assemble!

Legs assemble!

We departed from the instructions to magnetize our model at this point. It’s important to have a high end glue like CA21 (Zap a gap) on hand, as the standard model glue will not hold to the metal.

Magnetizing the Knight

Two magnets, oriented by bond, the lower glued to the torso.

As you can see, we cut a section of sprue about 2 1/2 inches in length. Each was glued in place (though not obviously magnet to magnet!) The idea is that we can seperate the magnets and we take the piece of sprue and place it inside the Knight’s upper torso, attached to the walls. You’ll find that it fits and can be easily glued in place inside the otherwise empty torso. Once this is done, check that the torso sits on the lower half with ease and adjust as needed before the glue dries. This allows the knight not only to turn at the waist for posing and general bad-assery, but also to be taken apart for transport in a much more stable form.

So, let’s ignore the fact that this picture was from after we’d started painting and pretend we’re following our own advice.

Nearly there

Nearly assembled

Once the main torso is assembled, leave off the top armor piece and the neck/throat armor coverings; we’ll want to paint these separately. Similarly, leave off the face mask for the knight as well.

You should be able to get the arms assembled as well and have them all ready for one big paint off.

And without further delay; here is Games Workshop‘s fine starter video that we used for our project as well.

Hopefully you found this all helpful and we’ll see you for part 2 where, like the video, we’ll get into the painting of the Knight.

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